Good Bathroom Feng Shui

From a Feng Shui perspective there is a lot to consider around how we use our bathroom. Many good Feng Shui principles for the bathroom are far less about layout, or even the quality of bathroom fittings, but more to do with our bathroom behaviour, or as I like to call it "Feng Shui Bathroom Etiquette".

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Feng Shui Principles

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May 3, 2021

From a Feng Shui perspective there is a lot to consider around how we use the bathroom. Many good Feng Shui principles for the bathroom are far less about layout, or even the quality of bathroom fittings, but more to do with our bathroom behaviour, or as I like to call it "Feng Shui Bathroom Etiquette".

Toilets

First of all let us consider the toilet itself - usually a standard feature of the bathroom.

The toilet is where we dispose of our bodily waste, and is one of the most important utilities in our home or office. We would soon be in trouble without one! By their very nature, the toilet can become dirty quite quickly, even in single person homes they are used regularly. Good Feng Shui says that a toilet should always be kept clean to avoid creating polluting chi that can emanate to the rest of the home. Therefore always keep a clean brush and detergent next to the loo, and encourage the house dwellers to use these cleaning aids after every visit.

Toilets have a lid for a reason! To be used! Loos have a seat for when the user wants to sit down, but regardless of whether the seat is used or not, the LID SHOULD ALWAYS BE CLOSED in between visits. A toilet seat has a lid, because it is supposed to be placed down. This is for two reasons, 1) to contain any smells and 2) to contain germs and negative chi.

Bathroom Doors

For the same reason the door to the bathroom, loo or cloakroom should also remain closed to contain any negative chi going into the rest of the home. This is absolutely imperative if the cloakroom, loo or bathroom can be seen when entering the front door of the property. If there is a window this should always remain open slightly to keep a fresh supply of air circulating through the room. Also doors to en-suite bathrooms, loos and showers should also be kept shut so that residents don't see the toilet from their sleeping position.

Water

In the Five Element model it is the bathroom which contains the most water in the home. Baths, showers, sinks and toilets all hold and circulate huge amounts of water. So the earth elements in these rooms should always be strong to contain the water effectively and prevent leaks. This means regular attention to grout, tiles, adhesives, fillers, tap washers etc. It's amazing how quickly all of these potential earth surfaces erode with the amount of water constantly passing over them. The bathroom is the one room in the house where it effectively rains inside the house!

Hygiene

The final point I like to make about good Feng Shui Bathroom Etiquette is the importance of keeping the room clean. This is the main room of the house that we use for our own ablutions (keeping ourselves clean and groomed). It makes sense therefore that there are a lot of germs and dirt taken and left in the bathroom. In addition to that we use a lot of grooming products too, such as soap, shampoo, deodorants etc. And we also leave hairs around the place too. As with all good Feng Shui it is better to clean up after ourselves as we go along than let dirt build up. Wiping round every time we use the sink, bath and shower is far easier than waiting for the cleaner to come once a week as the environment stays much fresher and more pleasant for all the occupants on a day to day basis.

Layout

From the perspective of layout, we're back to the toilet again. The more hidden or discreet a position the better. If you can site the loo behind a bathroom door, great.

Using mirrors in a bathroom can create more space and light, as the bathroom is often a small room relative to the frequency of which it is used. Try to avoid placing mirrors directly in front of the door but feel to use them on entire walls or to mirror the area behind the sink.

Baths work well close to windows to create a view from the bath.