Feng Shui for Gardens

Jon Sandifer, was always keen to remind me that 80% of what happens INSIDE a home is because of what is going on OUTSIDE the home. In other words, the energy of a home is affected way more by external factors than you might imagine.

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Feng Shui Principles

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May 3, 2021

My Feng Shui Master, Jon Sandifer, was always keen to remind me that 80% of what happens INSIDE a home is because of what is going on OUTSIDE the home. In other words, the energy of a home is affected way more by external factors than you might imagine. It is very important therefore that you pay attention to the space outside your home, outside the front door where energy enters the property, and at the site of the house - the important space behind your home which supports and energises your home too.

Form School Feng Shui

Traditional ancient Feng Shui looks at the "form" of the land surrounding your home. Ideally a gently hill behind your house provides stability and support. Open space, moving water at the front of the house brings positive energy or chi. A little more protection either side of the home, maybe also provided by gentle hills and trees. Of course in a city this is rarely available, however a large building or trees behind a home can provide "support" and a flowing river such as the Thames, or a busy main road, can provide energy / chi. In fact the chi of a city such as London is often fast moving and highly energising. Working on the same principle, a house located in a cul-de-sac will have slow moving chi and is a good place to retire or settle.

Communal Gardens

Many people in London may not have their own private garden, but may have access to communal gardens. Many flats and apartments overlook garden squares, which satisfy many things from a Feng Shui perspective. Similarly you may not have your own driveway, and park on the road. However you can still give attention to the main doorway to your apartment block or shared entrance.

Private Gardens

There is an old saying, "Good fences make good neighbours" and this is definitely true for Feng Shui. The boundaries between you and your neighbours should be of an appropriate height to give you enough privacy and to avoid being overlooked. They should be well maintained and considered as neutral zones. It's important that you don't put things on top of a wall between you and your neighbours that may not be to their taste.

Garden Layout

In terms of garden layout, it's important that everything is in proportion to the sizer of the area. Trees are great for creating privacy and shade, however the trees and bushes should be cut back regularly and not over grown, or too large for the space.

Although paved areas are much easier to maintain, they can create a predominance of earth. A good mix of elements is more auspicious. Try to create large borders of shrubs and plants, through the use of planters.

A water feature is also a good addition to the space, even if this is subtle feature such a bird bath.

It's also a good idea to install a simple irrigation system to keep everything well watered throughout the summer.

Mirrors are great to make small spaces effectively double in size.